Home
---------------
About
---------------
News
---------------
Films & TV
---------------
Records
---------------
Various
---------------
Links
---------------
Clips
---------------
Quiz
---------------
Fan Club Info
---------------
Roger Smith

When Ann-Margret took the stage at Uihlein Hall on Wednesday evening as a part of the "Unique Lives and Experiences" lecture series, she wondered aloud what people might want to hear about her life.

What she delivered, in a conversational, chatting-with-the-girlfriends style, was in part a portrait of an amazing, enduring career. But in greater part it was a portrait of the fears, loves, losses and challenges that are the common denominator of the human condition - whether or not we number George Burns and Elvis Presley among those who were dear to us.

Born in Sweden and brought to the U.S. at age 6, Margret saw her first film and a Radio City Music Hall Rockettes performance on one of her first days in the country. She recalled returning to Radio City Music Hall 13 years later, when she and her parents arrived to see her name in lights on the marquee. They were attending the premiere of the film "Bye Bye Birdie."

Using pages of notes as an outline for her comments, Margret referred fondly to some of the Hollywood luminaries with whom she has worked. She mimicked the gravelly voice and cigar-puffing pauses of George Burns to perfection. Yet she respectfully referred to George Burns as "Mister Burns" and Jack Benny as "Mister Benny," in a reminder of just how young she was when she first found herself in the company of Hollywood's elder statesmen.

Speaking of her relationship with Elvis Presley, she described a shy, funny, polite, kind and loving man with whom she formed a "mutual admiration society that never ended."

But this was not an evening built around name-dropping and Hollywood storytelling. The core of Margret's remarks were personal reflections on the obstacles and joys of life. She recalled learning English when she first arrived in the U.S. and spoke of the 22-foot fall that nearly ended her career.

She described the 33-year marriage that has been her mainstay, explaining her temporary departure from the public eye when she needed to help her husband battle myasthenia gravis.
Margret spoke of her parents with tremendous respect and affection, becoming emotional when recalling her father's final days and praising her mother's strength.

Throughout her comments, Margret admonished the audience not to waste a single day and not to let go of their dreams. Her last bit of advice was to follow her lead and always believe that the biggest things in your life are still ahead.

What could have been an interesting question-and-answer period following the lecture stalled with the request for an autograph from one audience member and a request for a photograph with the celebrity guest from another.

--------------------------------------------------------------

By Elaine Schmidt

--------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Various »

--------------------------------------------------------------

Home »


The Unofficial Home Of The Fantastic Ann-Margret | Various stuff | Magazines