Home
---------------
About
---------------
News
---------------
Films & TV
---------------
Records
---------------
Various
---------------
Links
---------------
Clips
---------------
Quiz
---------------
Fan Club Info
---------------
Roger Smith

Ann-Margret heats up
Auditorium with style, flash

On a night when the heat made even breathing seem difficult, Ann-Margret sang and danced and chatted her way back into the hearts of her hometown fans Thursday evening, giving an exceptionally satisfying show.

That her varied and lengthy performance was one of the shrewdest and most calculated entertainments ever to hit this clime mattered not to the audience at the Auditorium Theater, where Ann-Margret will be performing through Sunday. So gracious and accommodating was this local bunch that they lustily cheered ever the show’s special laser effects.

Ann-Margret’s show is entertainment at its most modern, a smooth combination of talent and technology, of lights and flash and visual pizzazz that at times tends to overwhelm the craft of the performers.

It is the same sort of mass appeal entertainment that was born and nurtured in the huge showrooms of Las Vegas and has, in the days of higher and higher ticket prices, found its way to the hinterlands.

During the 90-some minutes of Ann-Margret’s performance the audience beheld a wide variety of costumes, dancing and musical styles, laser acrobatics and even some movies. (The opening act, an impressionist named Scott Record, who poorly aped everyone from Tom Jones to former Grand Prix driver Jackie Stewart and diet guru Richard Simmons, was given such tumultuous applause one must assume many in the audience were victims of sunstroke.)

The evening’s performance consisted mainly and simply of alternating Ann-Margret solos and full-blown production numbers. The latter were most successful when they relied more heavily on their substance than their style.

A country and western number was loaded with some astonishingly pleasing high-stepping solos and a recreation of Chicago’s famed Chez Paree made up in verve what it lacked in historical accuracy. A very talented group of dancers ably abetted Ann-Margret throughout the evening and she provided enough sensual slinkiness and purring sexuality to have raised the temperature a few notches.

Still, for my taste, Ann-Margret was most attractively showcased when embellishments were minimal, such as during a medley of love songs - “How Long Has This Been Going On,” “Do it Again” and “Come Rain or Shine.” Her voice was powerful and full of a wistful emotion.

Perhaps she is not a commanding enough singer or dancer to control the spacious Auditorium stage by herself - thus this sort of let’s do everything we can trooperism - but you could have fooled me and hundreds of others during her solo stints.

She aimed so hard to please and was seemingly joyous and tireless, not to mention little girl gracious, in her efforts that one could easily suffer the occasionally intrusive glitter and tumult that surrounded her.

And while it is safe to assume - the lure of celebrity being a complex thing—that many in Thursday night’s crowd did not know what more to expect than a chance to be in the same, if rather large, room with Ann-Margret, one might also note that those people now know why for the next few days it’ll be as hot inside the Auditorium Theater as it is out on the city streets.

--------------------------------------------------------------

By Rick Kogan

--------------------------------------------------------------

Back to Various »

--------------------------------------------------------------

Home »


The Unofficial Home Of The Fantastic Ann-Margret | Various stuff | Magazines